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Missionaries Visiting Maine Parishes in 2016

Apostles of Jesus

The Apostles of Jesus missionaries serve in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, South Sudan, Ethiopia, Botswana, South Africa, Germany, Italy, Cuba, Australia, Papua New Guinea, and the U.S. in the ministries of primary evangelization, pastoral care of the sick, and chaplaincy to college and university students.

The religious missionary institute has over 500 members, priests, and brothers. Initial formation houses host more than 1,400 candidates in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, and South Sudan.

The Apostles of Jesus are engaged in primary evangelization and ministering to the poor and sick in Africa. Some of the missionaries work in formation houses in East Africa, offer pastoral ministry in parishes, educate orphans and the most disadvantaged, and minister to people who are either infected, affected, or afflicted by HIV/AIDS. The Apostles of Jesus also minister to impoverished, abandoned, and homeless children.

To learn more about the Apostles of Jesus, click here.


Augustinians of the Assumption

Centered in Jesus Christ and responsive to the needs of the time, the Augustinians of the Assumption are men of prayer and study living in fraternal community.

Founded by Fr. Emmanuel d'Alzon, the Assumptionists commit themselves to collaborative leadership and formation in the Church, teaching, preaching, and fostering education in all its forms.

The North American province serves in East Africa, Mexico, and the Phillipines.

The community proviides personnel and financial assistance to assist with charitable works at schools and nurseries and with formation programs for both the laity and clergy in these areas.

For more information about the Augustinians of the Assumption, click here.


Comboni Missionaries

The Comboni Missionaries is a Catholic congregation of priests, brothers, sisters and lay missionaries ministering to the world’s poorest and most abandoned in approximately 40 countries since 1867.

More than 4,000 priests, brothers, sisters, and laity from diverse cultures have dedicated their lives to following Christ's example and St. Daniel Comboni's missionary ideal of evangelization. Today, the Comboni Missionaries serve on five continents.

In all the places, they share their deep faith in God through service to the "poorest and most abandoned people" throughout the world by: ministering to them with sacraments and pastoral care, helping to improve their quality of life, and preparing local Christian leaders to do the Church's work among the people.

For more information about the Comboni Missionaries, click here.


Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament

Priests and brothers of the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament serve in the Philippines, India, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam.

In 1856, the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament was founded in Paris, France, Saint Peter Julian Eymard. All his life, he searched for an answer to the deep spiritual hungers of his day, and he discovered it in the Eucharist. Inspired by this sacrament, he inaugurated a new way of life in the church, one completely shaped by the Eucharist celebrated, contemplated, and lived in communion.

Fr. Norman Pelletier, S.S.S., (pictured, right), the former superior general and provincial superior for the congregation, is a native of Maine.

Fr. Pelletier has many countless trip to offer pastoral care in the Asian countries and was instrumental in fostering the collaboration of the U.S. and Asian provinces. 

The mission of the congregation is to share the riches of God’s love manifested in the Eucharist.

For more information about the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament, click here.


Daughters of Divine Love Congregation

The Daughters of Divine Love Congregation is a Pontifical and International order of religious women founded by Bishop Godfrey Mary Paul Okoye, CSSP, on July 16, 1969 in Nigeria, during the agonizing and ravaging Nigeria-Biafra War.

The death of the founder, barely seven years after the founding of the Congregation, put its survival in question; however, the Congregation only continued to grow and thrive.

The congregation has over 900 professed members. The formation house is blessed with many vocations, including aspirants, postulants, and novices.

The congregation is engaged in variety of apostolates in different parts of the world, including the U.S., Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, Germany, England, Italy, Switzerland, Australia, France, Nigeria, Chad, Gabon, Cameroon, Mali and Kenya.

They minister to all walks of life where manifestation of God’s love is needed.

For more information about the Daughters of Divine Love, click here.


Daughters of the Holy Spirit

The Daughters of the Holy Spirit are a 300 year-old international Roman Catholic Religious Congregation of women, founded in a small town in Brittany, France in 1706. The first Daughters of the Holy Spirit chose to live together to serve the poor, the sick and the children, recognizing in them the person of Jesus Christ.

They were attentive to the calls of the Holy Spirit and entrusted themselves to Mary, their advocate with the Spirit. Throughout the years, the sisters have found ingenious ways of surviving revolution, persecution and the myriad changes which religious life has undergone since the beginning of the eighteenth century.

Displaced by anti-clerical persecution in their homeland, some Daughters of the Holy Spirit arrived in the United States in 1902. Bishop Tierney of the diocese of Hartford, Connecticut, was the first to welcome the French-speaking refugees; but in a short time, bishops in Rhode Island, Vermont, western Massachusetts and upper New York State had welcomed these devoted religious women to neighborhoods and parishes impacted by the emigration of French Canadian laborers to the burgeoning textile mills.

Gradually the ministry of the Sisters expanded to include a variety of pastoral and social services not only in the New England but also in Alabama, central California, Appalachia and the Delmarva Peninsula. Over the years, Sisters from the USA Province have joined Sisters from other DHS Provinces on mission China, Chile and Peru, Cameroon, Nigeria. Burkina Faso, and Romania.

For more information about the Daughters of the Holy Spirit, click here.


Dominican Province of St. Joseph the Worker (Nigeria & Ghana)

The Dominican Province of St. Joseph the Worker (Nigeria & Ghana) is comprised of 189 friars.

Blessed with an abundance of vocations, they strive to live out their Dominican and Thomistic traditions as they face the challenges of West Africa. The Dominican Order is a Roman Catholic religious order founded by Saint Dominic de Guzman in France and approved by Pope Honorius III on December 22, 1216.

The foundation of the Dominican Province of Nigeria and Ghana began with the arrival in February 27, 1951, of Fr. Michael J. Dempsey, OP (later Bishop), Fr. Edward T. Lawton, OP (later Bishop), and Fr. Arthur Kinsella, OP, in Yaba. Little did these three pioneer Dominicans realize that from such ordinary beginnings, a large and sturdy branch of the Dominican Order would develop in West Africa, and in fact, still be the only province of the Order on the African continent.

Together, with all peoples of good will and in dialogue with them, they seek God wherever truth may be found. Living a common life of prayer and study, their faith is nourished and they are moved to communicate what they have contemplated to others, and to encourage them to contemplate with us the mystery of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

For more information about the Dominican Province of St. Joseph the Worker (Nigeria & Ghana), click here


Foundation for Children in Need

Foundation for Children in Need (FCN) was founded by Tom Chitta and Geetha Yeruva in 2002 in Arlington Heights, Illinois. It is a not-for-profit organization that provides help to needy children, college students, and elderly in the rural villages of India. FCN also addresses various needs such as medical care, health education, and women's issues.

Currently, FCN is sponsoring nearly 2000 children and college students and 50 elderly. FCN has established several schools, a few boarding homes for boys and girls, St. Xavier’s Home for the Aged, and Sneha community health center. FCN also trains women serving the needy in rural areas of India.

Since 1980, Tom and Geetha have been working in the villages in the State of Andhra Pradesh in South India. They facilitate the sponsorship program assisted by part-time staff and volunteers in U.S.,, and teachers, social workers, and staff in India.

For more information about the Foundation for Children in Need, click here.


Franciscan Mission Service

For almost 25 years, Franciscan Mission Service has helped lay North Americans engage in long-term service in Bolivia, Guatemala, Jamaica, and Washington, D.C.

In the spirit of Saints Francis and Clare of Assisi, their missioners address issues of poverty and accompany our marginalized brothers and sisters through education, prison ministry, soup kitchens, sustainable agriculture, homelessness ministry, women's empowerment, youth outreach, and more.

Lay Catholics are prepared for missions that can last a week, a year, or two years, all serving in solidarity with impoverished and marginalized communities across the globe.

Franciscan Mission Service is one of only a few Catholic lay mission organizations in North America with a focus on international mission. Missioners are transformed and deepened in their faith. For many, the service experience brings out leadership skills and new ideas that prompt positive social change at the local level in North America.

For more information about the Franciscan Mission Service, click here.


Franciscan Missionary Brothers

The Franciscan Missionary Brothers serve in India, Sri Lanka, Paraguay, Bolivia, Ghana and Kenya.

Their ministries focus on the care of children, leprosy patients, and people infected with HIV/AIDS.

In addition, the brothers also serve to evangelize, educate, and assist with rural development.

The Franciscan Missionary Brothers have a long tradition of caring for others.

Their roots and the age-old tradition of caregiving, compassion, and dedication can be traced 800 years into the past.

For more information about the Franciscan Missionary Brothers, click here.


Franciscan Missionary Sisters for Africa

The Franciscan Missionary Sisters for Africa began in 1903 in Uganda when Mother Kevin and five companions took the risk to leave country, family, and friends, and accepted the invitation to the unknown: the beginning of a missionary venture that spanned oceans and cultures, binding peoples of Asia, Europe, North America, and Goa in the great adventure of living the Gospel.

Inspired by her spirit and leadership schools, hospitals, clinics and training institutes were established in Uganda, Kenya, South Sudan, Ethiopia, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa.

Through Mother’s inspiration and the inspiration of many other Missionaries, the African Continent has developed in the areas of education, medical, spiritual and pastoral needs. Although much has been accomplished, the needs continue to be many.

In the spirit of Mother Kevin, the community continues to serve in Uganda, Kenya, South Sudan, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

For more information about the Franciscan Missionary Sisters for Africa, click here.


Glenmary Home Missioners

Glenmary Home Missioners, which celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2014, is a Catholic society of priests and brothers who, along with coworkers, are dedicated to establishing a Catholic presence in rural areas and small towns of the United States where the Catholic Church is not yet effectively present.

Inspired by the vision of society founder Fr. William Howard Bishop, Glenmary missioners and lay coworkers strive to serve the spiritual and material needs of those living in some of the most impoverished counties in the South and Appalachia, and to proclaim and witness to the Good News of Jesus Christ and the power of God's love, mercy and justice.

When Glenmary Home Missioners was established in 1939, Fr. Bishop foresaw that this area, then as populous as Canada, as large as Mexico, and covering one-fourth of the United States, could be lost to the Church unless this vast priestless "home mission" area was recognized by and designated a specific ministry of the Church.

Glenmary Home Missioners (aka The Home Missioners of America) was founded in 1939 by Father William Howard Bishop, a priest of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, to serve what he termed "No Priest Land, USA." At that time, he noted that more than one-third of the counties of the United States, mostly in Appalachia and the South, had no resident priest. Father Bishop foresaw that this area—then as populous as Canada, as large as Mexico and covering one-fourth of the United States—could be lost to the Church unless this vast priestless "home mission" area was recognized by and designated a specific ministry of the Church.

Father Bishop's initial dream has forged Glenmary's unique identity today as the only Catholic missionary organization working exclusively in the rural United States.

- See more at: http://www.glenmary.org/about-us/#sthash.BSSJyVS1.dpuf

For more information about the Glenmary Home Missioners, click here.


Glenmary Home Missioners, which celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2014, is a Catholic society of priests and brothers who, along with coworkers, are dedicated to establishing a Catholic presence in rural areas and small towns of the United States where the Catholic Church is not yet effectively present.

Inspired by the vision of society founder Father William Howard Bishop, Glenmary missioners and lay coworkers strive to:

  • serve the spiritual and material needs of those living in some of the most impoverished counties in the South and Appalachia;
  • proclaim and witness to the Good News of Jesus Christ and the power of God's love, mercy and justice.

- See more at: http://www.glenmary.org/#sthash.shNWWh0p.dpuf

GleGlenmary Home Missioners, which celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2014, is a Catholic society of priests and brothers who, along with coworkers, are dedicated to establishing a Catholic presence in rural areas and small towns of the United States where the Catholic Church is not yet effectively present.

Inspired by the vision of society founder Father William Howard Bishop, Glenmary missioners and lay coworkers strive to:

  • serve the spiritual and material needs of those living in some of the most impoverished counties in the South and Appalachia;
  • proclaim and witness to the Good News of Jesus Christ and the power of God's love, mercy and justice.

- See more at: http://www.glenmary.org/#sthash.shNWWh0p.dpuf

Glenmary Sisters

The Glenmary Sisters are a small community of Catholic Sisters who live and minister in the midst of those we serve.

The congregation was founded in 1941, two years after the Glenmary Home Missioners (above) by Fr. William Howard Bishop. The community will celebrate its 75th anniversary in October.

The Glenmary Sisters have established missions in many impoverished and rural areas of the South and Appalachia where the Catholic population is often less than two-percent. The sisters' presence and ministry is important in that we may be the first Catholics these people have come in contact with, and through this compassionate outreach, they endeavor to realize God’s loving presence in their lives.

The sisters are missioned in western and eastern Kentucky, southeast Georgia and southern Missouri, and feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless, visit the sick and those in prison, and bury the dead.

For more information about the Glenmary Sisters, click here.


Little Sisters of Saint Francis of Assisi

The Little Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi (LSOSF) serve in  Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. The congregatoin also serves in the U.S.

In 1923, the Little Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi was founded in Uganda by the late Mother Mary Kevin Kearney, a Franciscan Missionary from Ireland. 

Their mission is to love, care, and serve their neighbors, especially the poor, the marginalized, and the needy in our society today, following the footsteps of St. Francis of  Assisi and the spirit of their foundress. 

The congregation isinvolved in taking care of the homeless/street children, the elderly, people living with HIV/AIDS, refugees, orphans, women, and people with various disabilities. 

They provide health services (medical care) to the poor people in the villages. 

Some of the sisters work in the parishes as social workers and teach religious education.  Other sisters are involved in education ministry in all levels.

For more information about the Congregation of Little Sisters of Saint Francis of Assisi, click here.


Maryknoll Lay Missioners

Maryknoll Lay Missioners is a Catholic organization inspired by the mission of Jesus to live and work with poor communities in Africa, Asia and the Americas, responding to basic needs and helping to create a more just and compassionate world.

The lay Catholic community crosses boundaries of culture, nationality and faith to join their lives with impoverished and oppressed peoples of the earth. With them, we discern the presence of God’s Spirit in all creation and in the world’s many cultures and religions, and work toward human liberation and interreligious dialogue in Africa, Asia and the Americas.

The missioners strive together for justice, peace and fullness of life. Their ministries are offered in response to the needs of the people with whom they live and work, and with respect for the integrity of all creation.

They are inspired by the rich tradition of Catholic social teaching and are grounded in the history and spirit of our Maryknoll mission family. Believing that all people are called to mission, the organization actively promotes the role of laity in global mission while committing themselves to share this journey in ecclesial teams of priests, sisters, brothers and laity.

For more information about the Maryknoll Lay Missioners, click here.


Missionhurst-CICM Missionaries

Missionhurst-CICM Missionaries serve in the Philippines, Mongolia, Indonesia, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Congo, Cameroon, Senegal, Zambia, Haiti, Brazil, Mexico, Guatemala, Dominican Republic, Belgium, Netherlands, Italy, and the U.S. The missionaries are sent to proclaim the Good News to places where the Gospel is not preached or lived. 

The Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (CICM) was founded in 1862 by a Belgian diocesan priest, Fr. Theophile Verbist, for the evangelization of China. He and his companions were entrusted with the Northern part of China (Inner Mongolia). In 1946, the congregation bought a manor in Arlington Virginia, which they called “Missionhurst” to serve as a base for the financial support of the China Mission and other growing missions around the world. Missionhurst would be the central house for the CICM Province in the United States.

The China mission ended after the Communist takeover of China. All CICM missionaries were expelled. By then, Fr. Verbist's religious mission congregation had grown into an army of missionaries in frontiers elsewhere.

Inspired by their founder’s devotion, Missionhurst-CICM missionaries have now proclaimed the Good News in some of the most remote places on earth. Today, almost a thousand priests and brothers from the United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia continue serving and caring for God’s poorest and most neglected people.

For more information about Missionhurst-CICM Missionaries, click here.


Missionaries of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary

The Missionaries of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary are a religious congregation of priests and brothers dedicated to serving the needs of God’s family while witnessing the great love present in the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary.

Missionaries of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary serve in eight nations: Italy, Argentina, India, Slovakia, Nigeria, Indonesia, Colombia, and the U.S.

Saint Gaetano Errico opened the first novitiate with seven novices in 1836. By 1846, their members had grown and several additional community houses has been established. Although the approval of the rules for the new congregation had been decreed in 1838, the final decree of approval was given by Pope Pius IX in July of 1846. In March of 1858, Fr. Errico established a house in Rome which now serves as the generalate of the congregation.

The first goal of the missionaries is to toil to make known to all people the most ardent love of the Sacred Hearts for us and to kindle this holy and diving love in the hearts of all humanity.

For more information about the Missionaries of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, click here.


Missionaries of St. Francis de Sales

Missionaries of St. Francis de Sales, also known as Fransalian Missionaries, is an international congregation of religious priests and brothers. 

The congregation was founded in France in 1838 by Fr. Peter Mermier, under the patronage of St. Francis de Sales, with the first group of missionaries going to India in 1845. Today, the congregation serves seven provinces in India and one province in Africa.

There are about 1,200 priests in the congregation who serve in parishes, schools, hospitals, seminaries, orphanages and other charitable organizations all over the world.  About 800 priests are involved in active missionary work in different parts of India. Most of them work in parishes which are in remote and rural areas. The Christians in these areas are poor and not able to make any financial contributions to the church. The congregation need external assistance for the building and maintenance of churches and schools, paying teachers, running orphanages, and training catechists.

In addition, there are about 700 seminarians in different levels of formation in the mission provinces. Since most of them come from poor families, all their expenses are to be met by the congregation. The total expense for a seminarian for a year is about $1,700.

For more information about the Missionaries of St. Francis de Sales, click here.


Missionary Sisters of the Society of Mary 

The Missionary Sisters of the Society of Mary are engaged in missionary activity in 24 countries around the world, including in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America.

The sisters are sent on mission beyond frontiers to live and proclaim the Gospel and are inspired by Mary, confident of her help.

The consecrated women live in multicultural communities, knowing that the Spirit precedes them, to spread the same spirit He created in the hearts of their pioneers.

The sisters are mostly involved in missions that provide education and enhance religious communication.

For more information about the Missionary Sisters of the Society of Mary, click here.


Missionary Society of St. Paul

The Missionary Society of St. Paul (MSP) is a congregation of priests founded in Nigeria in 1977 by Dominic Cardinal Ekandem. Presently, the society has 251 priest members.

The MSP is presently working in ten African countries, three European countries, two countries of Central America, and in the U.S., spreading the good news of God’s salvation through primary evangelization, parish ministry, social justice, hospital chaplaincies, schools, and spiritual formation.

In addition, over 100 seminarians are undergoing seminary formation on their two campuses in Nigeria.

Their missions in Africa provide rehabilitation and support for orphans who lost their parents due to HIV/AIDS; portable water for communities in Chad, Malawi, South Sudan and Nigeria; and support for the formation of future missionaries. The priests are equally involved with the founding/building of new churches.

The generosity of people around the world helps sustain these works.

For more information about the Missionary Society of St. Paul, click here


Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill

The Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill is an international, apostolic community of women religious, baptized in Christ, and vowed to continue the mission of His Church.

In the spirit of St. Vincent de Paul and St. Elizabeth Seton, the congregation conceives its purpose to be an active ministry on behalf of the Kingdom.

This service is informed by Gospel values, responsive to the needs of a changing world, guided by the prudent use of available resources, respectful of human dignity, protective of human rights, devoted especially to the poor and oppressed, rooted in faith, animated by prayer, supported by the common life, and performed in humility, simplicity and charity.

The sisters serve in five countries. In the U.S., they serve in nine states, nine dioceses, and four archdioceses.

For more information about the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, click here.


Sisters of St. Francis of Tiffin, Ohio

The Sisters of St. Francis of Tiffin, Ohio, are Catholic women drawn by an insatiable hunger for God, who desire to live according to the gospel and to spend our lives extending the reign of God.

Inspired by the lives of Sts. Francis and Clare of Assisi, they live in simplicity, hospitality and joy, celebrating God who is ever our refuge and strength.

As an expression of gospel living, the sisters live in community and dedicate their lives to evangelizing service.

The sisters work to support the people of God and strengthen the Catholic faith in rural and urban areas of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky and West Virginia.

Their ministries include evanglization, education, health care, foster care, shelter for victims of trafficking and abuse, prison ministry, and child care.

For more information about the Sisters of St. Francis of Tiffin, Ohio, click here.


Sisters of the Divine Savior

The congregation of the Sisters of the Divine Savior, also known as the Salvatorian Sisters, was co-founded in Tivoli, Italy in 1888 by Venerable Francis Mary of the Cross Jordan with Blessed Mary of the Apostles.

The international congregation of more than 1,100 Salvatorian Sisters ministers in 28 countries on five continents.

In the U.S., nearly 70 sisters are involved in many ministries in their local communities, including the prevention of human trafficking.

Internationally, over 1,000 sisters minister to local people in need to ensure that all may know the Savior.

These ministries include assisting children in the Phillipines, orphans in Sri Lanka, people with special needs in India, and kindergarteners in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

For more information about the Sisters of the Divine Savior, click here.


Sisters of Mary Immaculate

The Sisters of Mary Immaculate (Sisters of Mary of Nyeri) is a women religious community that was founded in Kenya by Bishop Filipo Perlo and three founding members in 1918.

In founding the congregation, Bishop Perlo, an Italian missionary, believed that anyone who would become part of the new community would walk in the footsteps of Jesus Christ in caring for the poor, the most needy, and those who were suffering.

Today, more than 400 sisters actively serve in teaching, healthcare, pastoral duties, and a variety of social ministries in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Italy and the U.S.

The sisters currently staff and provide administration for ten primary and three secondary schools throughout East Africa. Additionally, the sisters maintain three orphanages, two hospitals and five clinics in the region. The sisters also provide vocational training through three skill-development centers and are in the midst of developing university-level educational opportunities for the poorest young men and women of Africa.

For more information about the Sisters of Mary Immaculate, click here.


Society of African Missions

The Society of African Missions, commonly known as SMA Fathers, mostly serve in the most abandoned areas of Africa evangelizing, building local communities of faith, building schools, and helping people have their basic needs. 

For nearly 155 years, SMA missionaries have been in Africa providing both spiritual and practical care for those they serve, particularly the people who are most forgotten or abandoned.

They proclaim and live the life-giving Gospel of Jesus Christ with the people of Africa, bringing the sacraments and service of the Catholic Church to them.

They help establish and support local churches, local clergy, and local lay leadership. They support the African people and the Church in Africa as they struggle with political, economic, and spiritual challenges, but also bear witness to what is good and beautiful in Africa.

SMA missionaries serve as pastors, teachers, health care workers, construction workers, farmers, and in any role that enables them to help our brothers and sisters in Africa. SMA missionaries also strive to preserve and encourage African art and culture.

For more information about the Society of African Missions, click here.  


Society of Mary

The Society of Mary is composed of priests and brothers in seven provinces and four missionary districts around the world.

In the United States, the Marists reach from East Coast to West Coast and from Canada to Mexico.

They reach out to all people, especially those who feel alienated, and encourage the Church to unify in its diversity and to be transformed by the spirit of Mary.

Their apostolic work takes them to parishes, schools, college campuses, prisons, hospitals, and missions in this country and overseas.

For more information about the Society of Mary, click here.


SOLT

SOLT (Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity) is a community of disciples of Jesus through Mary composed of all vocations: priests, deacons, brothers, sisters and single and married laity.

SOLT was founded in 1958 and has been approved by Rome as a Society of Apostolic Life of Diocesan Right.

Disciples of Jesus through Mary, living in Marian-Trinitarian communion, serve on ecclesial family teams in areas of deepest apostolic need. Ideally, an ecclesial family team is composed of SOLT priests, religious, and lay persons. 

SOLT has missions in thirteen countries including England, the Philippines, Thailand, China, Belize, Guatemala, Haiti. and Mexico. There are several missions in the United States, including a mission for Native Americans in North Dakota, work with migrant farm workers in the midwest, and inner city parishes in Detroit, Corpus Christi, and Phoenix. 

For more information about the Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity, click here.


Vincentian Congregation (St. Joseph Province)

The Vincentian Congregation was founded in Kerala, India, on November 20, 1904, modeled after the Congregation of the Mission founded by St. Vincent de Paul.  

Members of the Vincentian Congregation, all natives of India, follow the charism and spirit of St. Vincent de Paul.

They serve Christ’s poor in ministries of preaching, parish ministry, teaching, seminary formation and missionary work, wherever the Lord calls.

They serve in the States of Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Goa, Maharashtra, Karnataka, and West Bengal in India. 

God has provided the community with faith-filled priests to bring Jesus’ unconditional love to all people, especially the poor. 

For more information about the Vincentian Congregation, click here